Friday, May 07, 2010

Democracy 2: Cleggmania

Before midnight, an eternity ago, Andrew Neil on BBC 1 conducted a bizarre four-way interview at an election cocktail party on a boat with Tony Parsons (cocky), Joan Collins, Victor Meldrew and Armando Iannucci, during which the last complained that the British people had, essentially, chickened out of voting for the Lib Dems even though they wanted to. This confirmed what I had dimly suspected about Iannucci – that he is a staggeringly arrogant git who hates people and thinks everyone but himself is an idiot. Luckily he also makes funny programmes. Contra Armando, the dismal failure of the Lib Dems to live up to the hype reveals (1) that “who do you think did well in the debate?” is a different question to “who will you vote for?”; and (2) that people didn’t vote Lib Dem yesterday because the Lib Dems have all the same bad policies they had at the last election.

Meanwhile, the Scots and Welsh, who have devolved Parliaments, continue to prevent the Conservatives forming a Government despite the clear will of the English people that they should. Thus we English continue to oppress the Celtic people in our tyrannical way, just as we have since 1746 when our Royalty order-…oh theyre is so much more a could say but a canny be arsed…

14 comments:

Gaw said...

That boatful of puce-faced, pissed-up liggers was enough to make one wish for revolution. No wonder it's only shown after the polls have closed.

Parsons was only exceeded in his arse-ness by T Young. And we license payers had our cards behind the bar. I turned over.

Brit said...

Harriet Harman on the Beeb at the moment is clearly stating that she thinks a Lab-Lib coalition (which literally zero people voted for) should govern.

In which case hand over the balaclava and molatov cocktail, I'm with you in the Revolution.

Gaw said...

It would though be amusing to see GB try to clean up his own mess. But then he might succeed and where would we be then? A second full term would beckon our conquering hero...

worm said...

turned on the telly at 10pm. saw Dimbleby say 'hung parliament'. swore. turned off TV.

the thought of another FIVE YEARS of Gordon GBrown and Labour makes me feel ill.

On a plus note, gold prices have had a massive jump today

Sophie King said...

Time to start stitching granny's jewellery into the hem of my dressing gown, I think.

malty said...

Go Gaw, go.
Exceeded only by this mornings insight into bedlam, the truly revolting...Dimbleby, that pompous-smug beneficiary of nepotism. The truly gruesome...Robinson and Wark. The truly batty..Schama. The staggeringly stupid...the academic squatting to (our) left of Dimbleby.
The staggeringly stupid academic at one point talked about "the 1974-6 period of political stability" The politico's may have been stable, the country was heading into oblivion.
The truly gruesome Robinson kept up his Worma Grimetongue act throughout, the truly gruesome Wark was, unfortunately in the train, not under it.
The smug little s-it Dimbleby perched his specs on the end of his nose.

Brit said...

Marks out of 10 for the BBC then, Malty?

malty said...

1/10, the lighting was pretty good

Brit said...

Clegg has just more or less ruled out a Lib Lab coalition.

Gaw said...

Dimbleby is a poisonous boff (does that get through the sweary nets?).

Gaw said...

That's a shame - I was preparing myself for a period of perverse enjoyment.

malty said...

Gird loins Gaw, events, as they say, will unfold.
Holiday in Athens anyone?

Gaw said...

Malty, why go to Athens when it might soon be here? BTW I wish we could vote the BBC election oligarchy out of office.

zmkc said...

I loved it when Sadik Khan won Tooting, his supporters chanted 'Yes we khan' and Dimbleby, with his enormously superior knowledge of the world, explained to all his dim, unappetising, provincial viewers that what they were chanting was a 'vulgarisation of a slogan used during the recent American presidential elections.' And what a relief that someone else doesn't adore Ianucci - if only he didn't write such funny things, so I could dislike him without ambivalence.